How can I get consistent sizes with physically different monitors on Linux? by @edent
I can’t think of a concise way of wording this. I have three monitors. Each has the same resolution – 1920x1080px. But each one has a different physical size – 61 cm monitor, 39 cm laptop, and 48 cm monitor. Three monitors. Here’s my problem. When I move a window from one screen to another, ...

Sounds like you want to go back to tweaking an Xorg config file 🙂 A Monitor section has an option for a DisplaySize (in mm) that may be used (overriden by dpi from DDC file so may have to be disabled) but since the dimensions seem to be detected fine already I’d fiddle with xrand and if you’re happy with the results put that in ~/.xprofile or whatever. Here you can set anything without restrictions from the GUI. Example:

xrandr --output DisplayPort-0 --scale 0.8x0.8

Sadly this doesn’t seem to work with Wayland (I tried it even with XWayland for you). There was a project to rewrite xrandr but looks like it never flew. Latest solution to this seems to be wlr-randr that has according to source a --scale parameter but this requires wlr-output-management-unstable-v1 and while this may be in wlroots by now it’s not shipped (for me!) yet. Your mileage may vary.

“Releases for PC”. Oh we Linux gamers know this phrase well. So it seems that is taking another approach now instead of the usual “PC is not Windows”. Liam changed the wording on the news slightly:

Beyond a Steel Sky to release for Linux PC during July

https://www.gamingonlinux.com/2020/06/beyond-a-steel-sky-to-release-for-linux-pc-during-july

I like that approach and I shall also use “Linux PC” in the future. And not just for my .

 

How to install T2X for Thief 2 on Linux?

T2X Shadows Of The Metal Age main menu [run via Wine]

Good memories 😀 Nice to see I’m not the only nutter who played T2X on

https://parasurv.neocities.org/20200401-how-to-install-t2x-thief2-linux.html


File: /home/beko/.thief2/drive_c/Thief2/t2x/
Size: 4096 Blocks: 8 IO Block: 4096 directory
Device: 97fh/2431d Inode: 127271738 Links: 14
Access: (0755/drwxr-xr-x) Uid: ( 1000/ beko) Gid: ( 1000/ beko)
Context: system_u:object_r:unlabeled_t:s0
Access: 2020-05-25 17:42:23.679421134 +0200
Modify: 2012-04-27 23:13:23.844169998 +0200

According to https://beko.famkos.net/2012/04/28/thief-ii-the-metal-age/ I even wrote a tutorial on this at http://wiki.linuxgaming.de/index.php/Thief_II – and I should really syndicate this back. I’ve a bad feeling this won’t be much longer around.

I played the visual novel game Ken Follett's The Pillars of the Earth. I admit I didn’t even look up the details before when I got all three parts dead cheap as a bundle. I’ve a very faint memory of reading the book/s but that’s all. It looked like a decent point-and-click adventure available for and the idea was to play it via Steam Link in the living room with the kids around. Hint: Don’t do that.

The story is an emotional roller-coaster not shy of splattering blood all over the scene. There are dramatic moments where decisions have to be made [in time] but also peaceful chapters and fun moments. Some have to be spotted and can be missed. The story builds up slowly based on character development and decisions made. Or so it feels. All strings come together in the end and some scenes may change in detail but the overall outcome is probably the same. I’d have to read up on this or do another play-through to be sure though.

It’s not a difficult game. There are no riddles (minigames) to be solved. The only minigame included is some sort of timing game (“quick action”) where one has to click at the right moment. That was mostly annoying but mercifully simply reset the scene when it really mattered so one could try again.

Depiction of a town in 12th century England

The character style may be an issue for some. Animations are not very smooth and there seems to be no lip sync. Sometimes the animations don’t fire at all. The audio however is very good and makes up for this. Music and scenery are awesome. A lot of research went into this, unlike most games, and the depiction of 12th century England looks adequate [to me]. Since this is a hobby of mine I’m really thrown off if this does not match up in games [or movies]. I also catched the vibe of architectural love for cathedrals that I can relate to. While it’s timberframed buildings for me I can certainly understand the fascination. I visited Guédelon some years ago after all 😉

So if you like stories for your do yourself a favour and get this game. It’s worth every penny.