Dieser Tage dem Housekeeping zum Opfer gefallen: Die Parteizugehörigkeit zur

Mit dem Wegfall meiner 4-stelligen Mitgliedsnummer 34** erinnere ich mich gerne an die Anfangszeit. Die für mich so wichtigen Kern-Themen sind inzwischen in der Gesellschaft angekommen, womit sich meine Gründe für mein damaliges Engagement erledigt haben. Ich bin davon überzeugt dass vieles deutlich schlimmer hätte kommen können.

Inzwischen ist immerhin ein gewisses Bewusstsein für Datenschutz und Privatsphäre entstanden, was sich in Gesetzen wie dem (DSGVO) niedergeschlagen hat.

Wer sich nicht mehr erinnert, wie die Netz-Politik damals in Deutschland aussah, kann das Gedächtnis zum Beispiel im Archiv des AK-Zensur.de auffrischen.

Übrigens: Ich bin sogar weiterhin mit dem Parteiprogramm ganz einverstanden. Trotzdem fühle ich mich nicht mehr zugehörig und habe den Anschluss verloren. Damit ist das alles wieder bei Theater angekommen – und hier findet man den höchsten Unterhaltungswert gerade anderweitig *zwinkersmiley.

There’s a thing that puzzles me every time I visit some doctor, or hospital or dentist. You get it. Everywhere you get to sign a (or refuse to, like I do) and next thing happening is you’re sited in a room waiting for your turn. With a computer. Usually with your patient file already opened and on screen.

There is _so_ much you could do now. Like editing, opening other files, install a keylogger or some other device to the net – even wifi. WPS button is on the router next to it – default password on it’s back. System is in most cases horrible out of date and even if the screensaver is on it’s password is usually short, never changed and can be easily guessed or observed. And that’s all in a very sensitive setting. I observed this in various places now and when called out I get that “We’re not computer experts” shrug.

…but you signed that GDPR so all is [probably] good.

Am I the only one bewildered by this?

Most Linux users know some systemd by now. There is systemd stop $someservice and systemd disable $someservice. If you think that’s all one has to know about systemd you’re missing out on a lof of features. That’s not the story for today tho.

Some services tend to come back even when disabled and stopped. Socket services come to mind. This is e.g. the case for rpcbind starting a portmapper service on tcp/111 that can be used for a DDoS reflection attack. There are various ways to deal with this from uninstall to firewalling or to mask this service. Since everbody on Linux gets to pick their own poision I decided to use mask to make sure this can simply no longer start without having to break dependencies by removing it or fiddle with the firewall:

systemctl stop rpcbind.service
systemctl mask rpcbind.service
Created symlink /etc/systemd/system/rpcbind.service → /dev/null.
systemctl daemon-reload

A masked service can not even be restarted manually any more. It’s dead in the water as long as this symlink exists.

Read more on this from Poettering himself:

http://0pointer.de/blog/projects/three-levels-of-off

Visited Berlin / Germany for the to learn more about the . We changed plans last minute and went by train to the camp when we found out about the new and kinda cheap from Stuttgart to Berlin.

Tram station in Berlin

The itself has been a blast. The location was the office grounds of Mozilla Berlin and we were even offered a tour to take a good look at it (and it’s coffee machines).

The group was a very mixed bunch from various places. Some even took planes over the ocean to visit the camp on the continent. It’s nice to put faces on people I only knew from reading so far and I’m grateful for this chance.

Tantek Çelik speaking

The first day was all about getting to know the people. Organizer Tantek Çelik invited everyone to speak up and introduce themselves and their websites so we got a lot of examples of itches already scratched with principles.

We also learned about the OptOutTools project from the keynote speaker Teresa Ingram with the bold claim to work on AI capable of detecting misogyny online. It’s browser extention is designed like an ad-blocker or personal firewall where the user can decide how much of offending text may be displayed (or even none at all). Undetected phrases can be added to the filter to train it even more as well.

This resulted in a lof of discussion about intented and unintended side effects and how and in what ways speech will change and how people will try to break it. Detecing e.g. hate speech by AI is a goal even FB was (officially) not able to tackle so far. I’m very curious if and how this succeeds so I’ll keep an eye on their GIT repositories.

Learning about RFC 6920

Parallel other talks were held in various rooms. This way I learned about the proposed RFC 6920 on Naming Things with Hashes or a quick introduction to held by David Shanske. There were also some less technical discussions. Two teenagers attented to the camp as well so we had a talk about what’s in for them on the and we learned about TikTok dances. Some did their very first TikTok dance this day. So perhaps we’ll soon see a or provider for .

The evening was all about finding food for a group of ~15 people. That wasn’t an easy task. Berlin is an ever changing city and all restaurants were packed or gone for good. The online informations are sparse on this and way to often badly out of date. We were about to give up on this when we found a really small store that switches to some sort sort of food place in the evenings usually only visited by the local neighbourhood. They threw a bunch of tables together for us and somehow we all squeezed into it. Such a cozy and friendly place. I loved it and that night became a really short one for us.

The next day was about getting things done – a hard task beeing sleep deprived from the travels and short nights before.

While some just offered assistance others had more pratical goals in mind. This ranged from setting up a new enabled blog to hacking on gallery systems, location visualisation or in my own case on my provider for Okuna.io.

It’s really nice to see how other people work and get their projects done. Everybody has some very personal workflow here and I enjoy peeking over people’s sholders and catch a glimse of this.

In the end everybody got a chance to show what was achieved or learned. I got my prototype for backfeeding reactions going and used the chance to show this to the audience off the record without the cameras going. Okuna is still in closed beta so I’m sensitive on this topic. As mentioned I always have some invites to give away. I’d love to see more IndieWeb users on Okuna as well. I’ll need lab rats testers for my bridge soon anyway 😀

That was a great weekend and we met some awesome people at the camp. Of course we also snatched a bunch of new stickers and we ate as much candy from the stashes @MozillaBerlin as we could. Always fun to let the inner Geek run wild on such events 😉

One of the things about I love most is it’s flexibility. This may astonish some but I am gaming on my Linux system for approximately 15 years by now. Situation for improved a lot lately but it was always possible to keep myself distracted 😉

So one of the games I just love to play is XCOM (UFO series). I don’t think I skipped any part and Terror From The Deep will always have a special place in my heart. Anyway, when XCOM was relaunched and eventually ported to Linux by Feral Interactive in 2014 I thought I couldn’t have been happier. Firaxis Games topped this in 2016 with XCOM2 and Feral Interactive once more got the job for the port.

Sadly with all the expansion sets it takes quite a toll on the required hardware. Huge fan of all sliders on maximum and see how it goes and while my box can mostly keep up I notice that I run out of RAM towards the end of the game fast and my machine starts swapping. I’ve 16GB RAM and this game eats it away like children their candy.

I’ve got additional 4GB of swap installed on slow spinning rust disks (legacy) so I notice the moment it starts swapping like hitting a wall. After another frustrated restart of the game I paused for a moment. I don’t know why this games needs so much RAM and frankly I don’t even care. Maybe I’m spoiled nowadays since stuff tends to “just work”.

So I decided to throw more power at it but RAM is expensive and I usually have enough of it for my daily work (or other games). I did get a decent SSD (Solid State Disk) recently tho so it’s to my rescue:

swapoff -a
fallocate -l 16G /games/swapfile
mkswap /games/swapfile
swapon /games/swapfile

…and that’s it. I stopped my previous slow swap partition(s), created a new swapfile of 16GB size on my SSD, formatted it as swap partition and activated it. Now I tabbed back into my game and enjoyed the rest of the evening. Let it swap. The SSD can keep up with it. Not minding a few more seconds during loading screens 😀 I’m considerung to add the activation sequence to my “gaming mode” script.