Some weeks ago I started making a ship for based on NZ-43 (14C) and while I was happy with the basic result it helped me mostly to get an understanding how such ships were made.

I never cared much about ships before and had absolutely no idea about this topic at all. During my research to close that gap, which consisted mostly of reading into Flevobericht, 331 (ISBN 9036910862) and following the awesome actual model builds by @silverman834 at https://modelshipworld.com/topic/25300-a-small-cog-by-silverman834-scale-120-c-1410-finished/ did I decide to reapply the lessons learned and go for the famous so called “Bremen Cog” ship.

This is a very specific ship type that was widely used from the 12th century on for trade via the sea. It was between 15 to 25 meters long, had one square sail and was crewed by approximate 12 people that worked in shifts. Unlike other sailing ships it was very reliant on wind direction but it’s flat bottom permitted it to be beached without taking damage so it could be unloaded everywhere e.g. during low tide. The aftercastle on it’s stern deck makes for a very distinct impression and can be recognized from many period depictions of ships. Several full sized replica have been built to this date.

The “Bremen Cog” is the best preserved example of this ship type. It’s wreck from ~1380 was discovered in the Weser in 1962. It took almost 40 years until it could be presented to the public. It’s my understanding that the conservation techniques applied had to be developed first. It’s on display in the German Maritime Museum and the cog apparently played a huge role in the founding of the museum itself: https://www.dsm.museum/en/exhibition/exhibitions/bremen-cog

The museum is located in 27568 Bremerhaven / Germany (and closed during the wintertime). No idea when I’ll get the chance to visit this but the museum does also foster a YouTube channel and one of the most recent videos up on their channel is a drone flight around and through the Bremen Cog made by Dennis Vogt so make sure to check this out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjYigiyF014

So why did I take this effort on me to recreate this famous ship type once more in a game? Curiosity and hyper focus I guess. I can tell you it was cumbersome because the game does not support bend objects so everything is basically a block. It does also not feature tools for e.g. BĂ©zier curves or something. I spent quite some hours trying to get the hull and proportions right and while the superstructures are kinda opinionated I’m really happy with the end result. I also saved a lot on the ropes and while I know in theory how this should work and look it’s just _too much work_ to get this right in the game. So I only went with the most important running ropes. I hope any navigators reading this can forgive me 😉

The final result of the Bremen Cog under sails

I also prepared a variant without a sail and maybe I’ll even create a version with a reefed sail and with another version of the bow someday. I don’t know yet for I feel very exhausted from this little side project for now.

The final result of the Bremen Cog without sails

It’s also very sparse on final details because I can imagine that the blueprints for this ship will see a lot of reuse on various servers of the game so it should be really easy to individualise each placement with different colours or textures or cargo.

Speaking of: The blueprints for Rising World (Unity) can be downloaded from here:

You’re free to share and adapt this work as indicated by the CC-BY-SA 4.0 license. Please do inform me if you make use of this simply because that would make me very happy. It’s not required though.

One of my first experiences with was trying to get a P-51 into the air after getting comfortable with the Cessna. There is no special reason for this beside that it simply was one of my first plane models I got as a child. It’s not like I did know anything about this plane or avionics at all. It simply looked good so I went with it.

And I failed miserable on my first try. The P-51 was build for war and has like nothing in common with the set of controls I started to get comfortable with. Not that I know much about avionics to begin with, I mean. Anyway, YouTube to my aid: There is a wonderful channel named “Kermit Weeks” that I stumbled over when looking for answers and I found em here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4z1Z-WEZZGM

After watching all three parts I finally managed to get one off the ground in – felt really good about it and
 forgot about it again.

Until the YouTube algorithm decided to come back at me today and showed me https://animagraffs.com/how-a-p-51-mustang-works/ where it is explained in great detail how the P-51 Mustang actually works. There is a list of errata on the pinned comment on YouTube but after all this is a really high quality animated description of the plane and it’s workings.

I highly recommend to watch both pieces if you’ve only the slightest interest in planes or wartime history.

Richard Fitch on Twitter (Twitter)
“@BekoPharm @tudorfoodrecipe https://t.co/vNQQZJwa9T downloadable PDF of a scanned copy, well worth a read”

@tudorcook and @tudorfoodrecipe Thank you, got it. Also the mobi file.

Okay.

This · is · awesome!

Some long dead guy from ~1684 is talking to me on my ebook reader in 2020.

Oh wow. I’m following @Rob_Marshall for quite some time now but this one beats it all. “Wolf At The Door” is an interpretation of the siege of Stirling Castle in 1304.

There’s also a production video beside the rendered images and a lot of background information on the siege itself. Fiddling with Blender myself I’ve quite some understanding about the process involved so I can’t stress enough how freakin awesome this work is:

https://bobmarshall.co.uk/stirlingcastle/

Featured Image © www.bobmarshall.co.uk as of Bob Marshall’s Non-Commercial Image License Agreement

The Sword. Form and Thought | blog.HistoFakt.de by JSachersJSachers (blog.histofakt.de)
„The Sword – Form and Thought“ was the name of an exhibition held at the Deutsches Klingenmuseum (German Blade Museum) in Solingen from 26th September 2015 until 28th February 2016, and is also the title of the accompanying catalogue.

Re: http://blog.histofakt.de/?p=3358

The Sword – Form and Thought (ISBN 978-1-78327-427-7) is indeed a must-have for every sword enthusiast. Got my print years ago but I guess the recent prints are of the same fine quality.

AFM-Blog: Das Geheimnis des Binsenflechtens by Bettina Ronschke (ArchÀologisches Freilichtmuseum Oerlinghausen)
Die Verwendung von Binsen zur Herstellung von Matten und GefĂ€ĂŸen ist jahrtausendealt. Beim Binsenflechten sind ein paar Besonderheiten im Vergleich zum ĂŒblichen Korbflechten mit Weidenruten zu beachten. Hier geben Dir Anja und Bettina nĂŒtzliche Tipps zum Was? Womit? Woher?

AFM has an awesome detailled article on rush braiding:

https://blog.afm-oerlinghausen.de/das-geheimnis-des-binsenflechtens.html

Medieval Manuscripts on Twitter by @BLMedieval (Twitter)
“If you haven't caught on yet. Our Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts has been running for over 15 years. We think it's a great resource 😉, and here are some of the most recent additions https://t.co/P4UvAXBM3l”

Use this website to find and view descriptions and images of medieval and Renaissance manuscripts in the British Library:

https://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/welcome.htm

Mittelalterlicher Kran auf der Reisestation by Carina Wagner (ArchaeoCentrum bayern-böhmen)
Das 14. Jahrhundert ist wie kein anderes eine Zeit der großen Bauwerke. Kathedralen, Burgen, BrĂŒcken, ja, komplette StĂ€dte, die bis 
,Das 14. Jahrhundert ist wie kein anderes eine Zeit der großen Bauwerke. Kathedralen, Burgen, BrĂŒcken, ja, komplette StĂ€dte, die bis [
]

Good read about medieval building cranes in 14C including pictures of a reconstruction and it’s schema.

We revisited Schiltach 77761 / Germany today and this time we were lucky. The SchĂŒttesĂ€ge museum was open just as advertised. It’s free to visit and has a donation box.

Beside the framesaw and it’s water mills it also shows the history of Timber Rafting and Tanning in the area. A really small but nice museum.

After some refreshments – it was a very warm day this time – we moved over to the city museum that had a lot of stuff that could be touched or experimented with. A lot of fun for the kids. It also hosts a tiny library with books about the town – including several well known books about half timber by e.g. Manfred Gerner. This one is also free and has a donation box.

One of the most fascinating items on display is the model of the former “Zum Adler” inn (1604), that can be seen from the window of the museum.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SchĂŒttesĂ€ge_Museum

https://www.schiltach.de/en/Home

ISBN 978-3920801-93-3

Visited Dornstetten 72280 / Germany, that is part of the “German Timber-Frame Road”, for a lecture about Konrad Albert Koch held at the museum of local history (and that’s worth another visit).

Koch was an artist who lived from 1869 to 1945. He spent most of his life travelling to dozends of churches in the area to restore or paint various frescous and paintings. Not much of his work is wildly known but since a common scene on all of his pictures was discovered more and more work of him shows up nowdays.

We learnt all this from the speaker Peter Wagner, who invited to the lecture. A lot of the work of Koch can be found in his book “Der Burgenforscher Konrad Albert Koch” (The castle researcher / ISBN 978-3920801-93-3).

The more important part for us however is that Koch also started to paint castles and keeps – or what was left of them. Over time he got such a good understanding of medieaval structures that he started to draw castles how they might have looked like based on excavated ruins. People began to show up and helped to dig whenever Koch was in the area and his drawings became very popular. And they still are, in fact. Many of his pictures are still used to show how castles looked like on various historic sites.

And here is an interesting fact: Many of the castles and keeps were virtually recreated again using modern high-tech and latest archaeological insights. And many look very close to how Koch imagined them back then. And that’s from a time when the railroad was still on the raise and the choice of travelling was to trek or walk.

The pictures are from the beautiful market place of Dornstetten where we spent some time waiting for the beginning of the lecture.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konrad_Albert_Koch