Re-Visited Campus Galli in 88605 Meßkirch / Germany mostly for the new barn that is almost finished by now. My last visit was in 2019 so it was really time to see how much changed (despite the gorram pandemic). This time I took so many pictures that my battery drained.

Visitors aren’t allowed inside of the barn yet since it will be under construction until the end of the month. That was perfectly fine for me because catching the impression of the almost finished building is what I was after:

This cart also catched my attention so I checked it out closer. Spoiler: It doesn’t come with free rust proofer:

I consider myself lucky with the weather situation by the way. I could see a lot of systems that prevent flooding of the area in action – or not.

The orchard changed a lot since my last visit. The entrance for example is now completed.

Many trees were cut down for the constructions going on. Wood is needed everywhere and for everything on the site and some areas are becoming aerial.

The wooden church also got some changes. Most important the bell tower next to it and also a new porch. Couldn’t get enough of it.

All the other buildings required on a medieval construction site are also still there. Some show a lot of wear by now and constantly ongoing repairs are required.

The masons seem to be busy with a new arch. No idea where it will go tho 🤔 Their space doubles as a place to dry scales of wood in the attic.

This time I also managed to get pictures of some of the livestock!

This was a great day. Didn’t poke my nose outside much over the last year and I really missed excursion like this.

I also recorded some small video snippets so I may eventually come around creating a small video later too 🙂

https://www.campus-galli.de/

VAG on Twitter (Twitter)
“Assumed to be an inn for pilgrims but possibly private house for a nobleman. 3-bay hall of arch-braced construction to a crown-post roof (c1400?), with late 15C front range with queen post roof and wind braces. Massive jetty bressumer. St Albans, Hertfordshire. #VirtualVernacular”
Brigitte Webster on Twitter (Twitter)
“I shall give a demo on Medieval/Early Tudor Food & Cookery @ Kingsbury Barn, Branch Road, St Albans. Hertfordshire AL3 4SE on Saturday 21st Sep 2019 from 12.00 - 12.40. This venue is a superb example of a medieval barn dating to 1379. Demo part of a 3 day MEDIEVAL DAZE festival”

Medieval barn dating to 1379 – yes please 😀
(Also food, :D)

Visited the Museum Of Everyday Life in Castle Waldenbuch 71111 / Germany. This town is known for it’s chocolate factory of Ritter Sport but it does indeed have a very nice medieaval town core – timber-framed buildings included.

The museum itself is simply great. The place is huge and there is so much to see. It was also a great place for the kids who in opposition to usual museum trips did not just run from room to room. The exhibits really catched their attention and we spent a surprisingly long time inside.

My personal highlight was the opportunity to see the Family Swevia and Reisecen live showcasing their deeds. Two great living history groups that really do put a lot of effort and research in their presentations.

https://reisecen.de/

https://www.familia-swevia.de/

https://www.museum-der-alltagskultur.de/

https://www.waldenbuch.de/zielgruppen+englisch/home.html

We revisited Schiltach 77761 / Germany today and this time we were lucky. The Schüttesäge museum was open just as advertised. It’s free to visit and has a donation box.

Beside the framesaw and it’s water mills it also shows the history of Timber Rafting and Tanning in the area. A really small but nice museum.

After some refreshments – it was a very warm day this time – we moved over to the city museum that had a lot of stuff that could be touched or experimented with. A lot of fun for the kids. It also hosts a tiny library with books about the town – including several well known books about half timber by e.g. Manfred Gerner. This one is also free and has a donation box.

One of the most fascinating items on display is the model of the former “Zum Adler” inn (1604), that can be seen from the window of the museum.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schüttesäge_Museum

https://www.schiltach.de/en/Home

Timber Framed Buildings Explained by Trevor YorkeTrevor Yorke
The complete guide to recognising and understanding timber-framed buildings. Using his own drawings, diagrams and photographs, Trevor Yorke takes the reader through the story of these buildings from 1200 to the present day.

ISBN 978-1-84674-220-0 / Timber Framed Buildings Explained by Trevor Yorke

Current read: Timber Framed Buildings Explained

That’d be my latest bible on / [for Britain] by Trevor Yorke. £7.95 / ISBN 978-1-84674-220-0 / Timber Framed Buildings Explained specially for my current interest in traditional hall houses.