Re-Visited Campus Galli in 88605 Meßkirch / Germany mostly for the new barn that is almost finished by now. My last visit was in 2019 so it was really time to see how much changed (despite the gorram pandemic). This time I took so many pictures that my battery drained.

Visitors aren’t allowed inside of the barn yet since it will be under construction until the end of the month. That was perfectly fine for me because catching the impression of the almost finished building is what I was after:

This cart also catched my attention so I checked it out closer. Spoiler: It doesn’t come with free rust proofer:

I consider myself lucky with the weather situation by the way. I could see a lot of systems that prevent flooding of the area in action – or not.

The orchard changed a lot since my last visit. The entrance for example is now completed.

Many trees were cut down for the constructions going on. Wood is needed everywhere and for everything on the site and some areas are becoming aerial.

The wooden church also got some changes. Most important the bell tower next to it and also a new porch. Couldn’t get enough of it.

All the other buildings required on a medieval construction site are also still there. Some show a lot of wear by now and constantly ongoing repairs are required.

The masons seem to be busy with a new arch. No idea where it will go tho đŸ€” Their space doubles as a place to dry scales of wood in the attic.

This time I also managed to get pictures of some of the livestock!

This was a great day. Didn’t poke my nose outside much over the last year and I really missed excursion like this.

I also recorded some small video snippets so I may eventually come around creating a small video later too 🙂

https://www.campus-galli.de/

Oh wow. The @archaeologyuk writes:

All CBA publications are now temporarily FREE to download! From practical handbooks to research reports, dig into our archives and learn something new today. Please consider making a donation if you enjoy any of these publications.@archaeologyuk

https://new.archaeologyuk.org/books-and-publications

That includes

    • Research Reports
    • Practical Handbooks
    • Archaeology for All Series
    • Scottish Burgh Series
    • Occasional Papers
    • Research Bulletins
    • Education Publications
    • Other publication

Sadly it looks like their Sharepoint is currently overloaded and throttles new connections. Hope it’ll work again soon. Totally going for Timber–Framed Buildings 😀

Hat tip @VArchGroup

Visited Hechingen-Stein 72379 / Germany [again] to take another look at the reconstruction of a Roman Villa Rustica. It’s a large Roman countryside estate from the 1st to 3rd century AD that was discovered in 1972. The excavation site was turned into a museum with reconstructions on the original foundations.

It’s a very huge areal including smithies, a mill and even a dedicated temple area that can probably finally be visited starting next year. Plenty of the local findings can be seen in the museum. Visitors can move freely on the areal and discover plenty of interesting stuff.

The place is also a lof of fun for the children. They offer plenty of games, costumes, a playground and ice cream of course.

http://www.villa-rustica.de

ISBN 978-3920801-93-3

Visited Dornstetten 72280 / Germany, that is part of the “German Timber-Frame Road”, for a lecture about Konrad Albert Koch held at the museum of local history (and that’s worth another visit).

Koch was an artist who lived from 1869 to 1945. He spent most of his life travelling to dozends of churches in the area to restore or paint various frescous and paintings. Not much of his work is wildly known but since a common scene on all of his pictures was discovered more and more work of him shows up nowdays.

We learnt all this from the speaker Peter Wagner, who invited to the lecture. A lot of the work of Koch can be found in his book “Der Burgenforscher Konrad Albert Koch” (The castle researcher / ISBN 978-3920801-93-3).

The more important part for us however is that Koch also started to paint castles and keeps – or what was left of them. Over time he got such a good understanding of medieaval structures that he started to draw castles how they might have looked like based on excavated ruins. People began to show up and helped to dig whenever Koch was in the area and his drawings became very popular. And they still are, in fact. Many of his pictures are still used to show how castles looked like on various historic sites.

And here is an interesting fact: Many of the castles and keeps were virtually recreated again using modern high-tech and latest archaeological insights. And many look very close to how Koch imagined them back then. And that’s from a time when the railroad was still on the raise and the choice of travelling was to trek or walk.

The pictures are from the beautiful market place of Dornstetten where we spent some time waiting for the beginning of the lecture.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konrad_Albert_Koch

Visited Campus Galli in 88605 Meßkirch / Germany and it was awesome. Here you can witness the construction of a medieaval monastic with tools and techniques from the 9th century based on an original plan drawn over 1000 years ago.

https://www.campus-galli.de/?lang=en

Visited the lake dwelling settlement at 88690 Uhldingen-MĂŒhlhofen, District Unteruhldingen / Germany. Worth every cent. We had a great time there today. I was there as a child myself and I hope that mine will also keep this in good memory 😀

Today from the HobbyArcheology: Discovering lake dwelling artifacts with the little ones.

https://www.pfahlbauten.de/